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Characteristics of the lion according to the Bible

According to the lion character in the BibleCa 70 verse and a total of 140 references with the word “lion”, it is the most common wild animal in the Bible.
A calm lion is one of the elements in the description of heaven, which is very natural.

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According to the lion character in the BibleCa 70 verse and a total of 140 references with the word “lion”, it is the most common wild animal in the Bible.  More than 90% of the citations are in the Old Testament, and overall a picture of a pretty realistic lion is provided. These texts are written by people with first-hand experience of terrible and dangerous predators. The following quotes are representative choices for the different uses of lions in the Bible text.
In most references, the power and courage of the lion and its dangerous fierceness are the main content. Usually the lion is presented in a purely descriptive way, sometimes with a clear positive connotation: when no one pursues, the evil person will run away, but the righteous is as bold as a lion. (Proverbs 28:1) The lion, the most powerful of the beasts, will not turn back before any time; (Proverbs 30:30)


In the Old Testament, lions were often used as symbols of Israel. What is often emphasized is its aggression, but it is related to the militant ideals of the Old Testament. These qualities have the opposite meaning in the teachings of the New Testament and Jesus. Examples of the Old Testament are:
Judah is the cub of the lion; from the prey of my son, you have risen. He fell down; he crouched like a lion and a lioness; who dared to anger him? (Genesis 49:9)
One of the elders said to me, “Don’t cry again; behold, the lion of the tribe of Judah, the root of David, has been conquered so that he can open the scroll and its seven seals.” (Revelation 5:5)
Since the lion is used to represent the people of God, it is also used as a tool to fight against evil. Obviously, the punishment for those who leave the path of God is not the devil’s behavior, but the punishment of the father’s will:


Then he said to him, “Because you have not listened to the voice of the Lord, once you leave me, the lion will knock you down.” Once he left him, a lion met him and punched him. (1 Kings 20:36) At the beginning of their dwelling there, they did not fear the Lord. Therefore, the Lord sent the lion to them and killed some of them. (2 Kings 17:25)[15]
Four Bible verses are often quoted as evidence of the demon aspect of the nature of the lion. Two of them are just the most common images of lions. They are the most powerful and dangerous forces and potential enemies. They can only be defeated by the strongest and God’s help:
You will step on the lion and adder; young lions and snakes, you will trample under your feet. (Psalm 91:13) Save me from the mouth of the lion! You saved me from the corner of the buffalo! (Psalm 22:21)
The last two sections are concrete metaphors in which the lion represents the devil. However, once again it is not the deep essence of the lion that is relevant, but the quality of it as a dangerous hunter. The point is that anyone who is not prepared and seeks the protection of God will be the victim of the devil, just as he does to the lion:
Be clear-headed; pay attention. Your enemy devil wanders around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to swallow. (1 Peter 5:8) He ambushes in the jungle like a lion; he lurks that he might catch the poor; when he sucks him into the net, he catches the poor. (Psalm 10:9)


A calm lion is one of the elements in the description of heaven, which is very natural. When God overcomes evil, the lion does not need to be aggressive:
The wolf and the lamb graze together; the lion will eat straw like a cow, and the dust is the food of the snake. They will not be wounded or destroyed on all my holy mountains,” said the Lord. (Psalm 10:9)
When the biblical citations are treated as a whole, it is clear that the ferocious violent lions found in all these fables are used in the confrontation between good and evil. The lion is a simple picture of powerful power. The lion is likened to the Jewish and God’s just cause, and to the threatening devil. In the vast majority of cases, a lion is either compared to God or his people, or he is served by punishing injustice.